How to Choose the Proper Discus

If you are wondering why the past two blog entries have been discus related, the answer is simple. Track and Field is just around the corner and many of our customers here at Robbins Sports call in with questions about the proper track and field equipment. That is what drove me to write this entry.

Many high schoolers enter the track and field season pumped up and ready to go. They are so excited that sometimes they just jump right into it before knowing what it all entails. This goes for discus throwing as well. You may think that their is not much to discus – you pick up a round, metal object, twirl a couple of times and throw the thing as far as you can, right? Well, that is the jist of it. But to get the optimal distance it is important to choose the right sized discus. Below is a chart that indicates the right sizes for the right contestants.

Discus Selection Chart:

High School Girls:

Range: RIM Weight:

100' to 125' (70% to 73% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

120' to 150' (73% to 75% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

140' to 160' (75% to 80% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

150' to 165' (78% to 85% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

160' to 180' (85% to 89% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

175' to 190' (85% to 90% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

High School Boys

Range: RIM Weight:

100' to 130' (70% to 73% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

125' to 150' (73% to 75% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

145' to 160' (75% to 80% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

155' to 170' (78% to 85% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

165' to 180' (85% to 89% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

190' + (88% to 91% of the Competition Specifications Weight)

Discus Competition Specifications:

High School Girls

1 Kilogram

High School Boys

1.6 Kilogram

So, the way this chart works is as follows. If, for example, you are a high school girl who normally throws between 120′ and 150′, you would multiply 1 Kilogram by 73% ad 75%. The resulting weight of your discus, then should be the result – between .73 and .75 kilograms.



Source by Nishan Wilde

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